Vulkan-Monitor

In einer Tiefe ab 100 km, ist es zwischen 1000 und 1300 Grad Celsius heiß. Gestein beginnt zu schmelzen und sammelt sich in großen, tropfenförmigen Magmaherden in 2 bis 50 km Tiefe. Wenn der Druck zu groß wird, steigt das Magma über Spalten und Klüfte an die Oberfläche: Ein Vulkan entsteht.

Karte der augenblicklich aktiven Vulkane


Fuego (Guatemala), INSIVUMEH, Guatemala

Volcanic activity report for Fuego (Guatemala), 7 February-13 February 2018

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions at Fuego during 7-13 February generated ash plumes that rose as high as 1.5 km and drifted 10-12 km N, NW, SW, and S. Avalanches of material traveled down the Seca (W), Ceniza (SSW), and Taniluyá (SW) drainages on 12 February, and down the Las Lajas (SE) and Honda (E) drainages on 13 February. Ash fell in areas downwind on 13 February including Morelia (9 km SW) and Panimaché (8 km SW).
Neu

Kadovar (Papua New Guinea),

Volcanic activity report for Kadovar (Papua New Guinea), 7 February-13 February 2018

RVO reported that on 9 February the lava dome at Kadovar?s SE Coastal Vent collapsed, causing 5-6 minor tsunamis, less than 1 m high, observed by residents on Blup Blup?s E and W coasts. The waves were reported at 1050, before the main collapse of the dome. In a 12 February report RVO noted that activity from Main Crater consisted of white plumes rising 20 m and drifting a few kilometers SE and weak nighttime crater incandescence.
Neu

Mayon (Philippines), Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology

Volcanic activity report for Mayon (Philippines), 7 February-13 February 2018

PHIVOLCS reported that during 7-13 February activity at Mayon continued to be characterized daily by lava effusion from the summit crater, rockfalls, lava fountains, steam emissions, advancing lava flows on the flanks, and pyroclastic flows. Numerous rockfall events were generated from the front and margins of advancing lava flows. Lava fountaining was nearly continuous during 6-10 February, with around 290 lava-fountaining events recorded by the seismic network from 0557 on 5 February until around 0700 on 10 February. The events each lasted between 3 and 233 minutes, and were accompanied by rumbling sounds audible with a 10-km radius. Lava fountaining was sporadic during 11-13 February. Lava fountains during phases of both nearly continuous and sporadic activity rose as tall as 400 m, and produced steam plumes up to 2.5 km above the crater that drifted in multiple directions. Lava flows advanced to 3.3 km, 4.5 km, and 900 m in the Mi-isi (S), Bonga (SE), and Basud (E) drainages, respectively. Pyroclastic density currents traveled 4.2-4.6 km in the Mi-isi, Bonga, and Basud drainages. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a 0-5 scale) and the public was warned to remain outside of the Danger Zone defined as an area within an 8-km radius.
Neu

Agung (Indonesia), Centre of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation

Volcanic activity report for Agung (Indonesia), 7 February-13 February 2018

On 10 February PVMBG reported that activity at Agung had declined during the previous month or two leading the observatory to lower the Alert Level to 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and adjusted the exclusion zone to a 4-km radius. The report noted that the tallest eruption plume in January was 2.5 km above the crater rim, occurring on 19 January, and the last event on 24 January generated a plume that rose 1 km. The volume of erupted lava was an estimated 20 million cubic meters in December 2017, and had not significantly changed. Seismicity continued to fluctuate, though the number and magnitude of events had declined. Satellite data showed a decrease in thermal output reflective of a reduced lava flow rate. PVMBG warned that activity at Agung is still high and unstable; tiltmeter data showed low rates of inflation (GPS patterns were stable) and gas-emission data indicated magma movement at depth, though at a lower intensity compared to values measured at the end of November 2017. An event at 1149 on 13 February generated as ash plume that rose 1.5 km above the crater rim.
Ongoing

Aira (Japan), Sakurajima Volcano Observatory

Volcanic activity report for Aira (Japan), 7 February-13 February 2018

JMA reported that very small events occurred at Minamidake crater (at Aira Caldera?s Sakurajima volcano) during 7-9 February. Crater incandescence from the summit crater was visible during 8-10 February. An event at 2201 on 11 February generated a plume that rose 1 km above the crater rim. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).
Ongoing

Ambae (Vanuatu),

Volcanic activity report for Ambae (Vanuatu), 7 February-13 February 2018

Based on satellite, pilot, and webcam observations, the Wellington VAAC reported that during 8-9 February ash plumes from Aoba rose to altitudes of 2.7-3 km (9,000-10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and E.
Ongoing

Bagana (Papua New Guinea),

Volcanic activity report for Bagana (Papua New Guinea), 7 February-13 February 2018

Based on analyses of satellite imagery and model data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 7-8 February ash plumes from Bagana rose to an altitude of 2.4 km (8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE.
Ongoing

Cleveland (United States), Alaska Volcano Observatory

Volcanic activity report for Cleveland (United States), 7 February-13 February 2018

AVO reported that there was no evidence of significant activity at Cleveland since the last explosion was detected on 18 December 2017. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Yellow and the Volcano Alert Level was lowered to Advisory. AVO noted that low-level unrest continued.
Ongoing

Dukono (Indonesia), Centre of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation

Volcanic activity report for Dukono (Indonesia), 7 February-13 February 2018

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, wind model data, and notices from PVMBG, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 7-13 February ash plumes from Dukono rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.1 km (6,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE, E, and SE.
Ongoing

Ebeko (Russia), Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team

Volcanic activity report for Ebeko (Russia), 7 February-13 February 2018

Based on observations by volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), about 7 km E of Ebeko, explosions during 5-8 February generated ash plumes that rose as high as 2.4 km (7,900 ft) a.s.l. Ash fell in Severo-Kurilsk on 8 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Ongoing

Karymsky (Russia), Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team

Volcanic activity report for Karymsky (Russia), 7 February-13 February 2018

KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Karymsky was identified in satellite images on 3 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-color scale).
Ongoing

Kilauea (United States), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Volcanic activity report for Kilauea (United States), 7 February-13 February 2018

During 7-13 February HVO reported that the lava lake continued to rise, fall, and spatter in Kilauea?s Overlook crater. Webcams recorded incandescence from a small lava pond in a pit on the W side of Pu'u 'O'o Crater. Surface lava flows were active above and on the pali, and on the coastal plain.
Ongoing

Pacaya (Guatemala), INSIVUMEH, Guatemala

Volcanic activity report for Pacaya (Guatemala), 7 February-13 February 2018

INSIVUMEH reported that during 7-13 February Strombolian explosions at Pacaya?s Mackenney Crater ejected material 30 m above the main cone. Lava flows were at most 150 m long on the SW and W flanks.
Ongoing

Popocatepetl (Mexico), CENAPRED, México

Volcanic activity report for Popocatepetl (Mexico), 7 February-13 February 2018

Each day during 7-13 February CENAPRED reported 25-101 emissions from Popocatépetl, with emissions during 11-13 February containing slight amounts of ash. Explosions were detected at 0130 and 2213 on 7 February, at 0457 on 8 February, at 1729 on 12 February, and at 0631 on 13 February. Minor crater incandescence was visible on the morning of 9 February, and at night during 11-12 February. The Alert Level remained at Yellow, Phase Two.
Ongoing

Sabancaya (Peru), Instituto Geofisico del Perú

Volcanic activity report for Sabancaya (Peru), 7 February-13 February 2018

Observatorio Vulcanológico del Sur del IGP (OVS-IGP) and Observatorio Vulcanológico del INGEMMET (OVI) reported that explosive activity at Sabancaya was similar to the previous week; there was an average of 18 explosions recorded per day during 5-11 February. Seismicity was dominated by long-period events, with signals indicating emissions. Gas-and-ash plumes rose 3.9 km above the crater rim and drifted 50 km NW, SW, S, and SE. The MIROVA system detected three thermal anomalies. The sulfur dioxide flux was high, at 2,062 tons per day on 10 February. The report noted that the public should not to approach the crater within a 12-km radius.
Ongoing

Santa Maria (Guatemala), INSIVUMEH, Guatemala

Volcanic activity report for Santa Maria (Guatemala), 7 February-13 February 2018

INSIVUMEH reported that explosions at Santa María's Santiaguito lava-dome complex, detected by the seismic network during 7-13 February, generated ash plumes that rose as high as 700 m and drifted SW. Avalanches of material descended the E and SE flanks of the lava dome. Ash fell on La Florida ranch (5 km S) on 10 February.
Ongoing

Sheveluch (Russia), Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team

Volcanic activity report for Sheveluch (Russia), 7 February-13 February 2018

KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Sheveluch was identified in satellite images during 1-4 and 7 February. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.
Ongoing

Shishaldin (United States), Alaska Volcano Observatory

Volcanic activity report for Shishaldin (United States), 7 February-13 February 2018

On 7 February AVO reported that seismic and infrasound activity from Shishaldin declined to background levels during the previous month, prompting the observatory to lower the Aviation Color Code to Green and the Volcano Alert Level to Normal.
Ongoing


Die Daten stellt die Smithsonian Institution im wöchentlich aktualisierten USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report zur Verfügung.

In Deutschland gibt es momentan keine aktiven Vulkane. Der Vulkanismus in Deutschland in den verangengen Jahrentausenden bzw. Jahrmillionen wurde durch Hebung der Alpen verursacht. Dass dieser Prozess noch nicht abgeschlossen ist, zeigen kleinere Erdbeben vom Rheingraben bis zur Kölner Bucht. Die Vulkane, die es in Deutschland gibt spucken zwar zur Zeit keine Lava aus, aber es gibt in Deutschland an vielen Orten heiße Quellen. Diese Thermalquellen sind ein Zeichen dafür, dass Wasser im inneren der Erde erwärmt wird. Vulkanaktivitäten aus vergangenen Zeiten sieht man in Deutschland z.B. auch am Kaiserstuhl in der oberrheinischen Ebene und am Rand der Schwäbischen Alp.